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On the eve of an Opposition Day Debate in the House of Commons, Glasgow East MP Margaret Curran has called for the national minimum wage to be increased and properly enforced. The minimum wage increased above inflation for the first decade after its introduction in 1999; however its value has fallen in real terms since 2010.  It now stands at £6.50 per hour for employees aged 21 and over, with lower rates for younger workers and apprentices.

At last month’s Labour Party Conference, Ed Miliband announced ambitious plans to increase the minimum wage to £8 an hour. This increase would affect over one million workers and mean a pay rise worth £60 a week or £3,000 a year for full-time workers on the minimum wage.

Speaking ahead of the debate, Margaret said: ‘Since 2010 real wages have plummeted, with the average worker some £1600 a year worse off. That is why last month’s announcement that the next Labour Government will increase the minimum wage to £8 an hour is so welcome.’

In addition to increasing the minimum wage, Labour will also introduce Make Work Pay contracts to expand the Living Wage and set a national goal of halving the number of people on low pay by 2025.

Margaret added: ‘I am proud that Labour have put the issue of low pay at the top of the political agenda. As the 2015 election approaches it’s becoming more and more apparent that Labour is the only party, in Scotland or the UK as a whole, that will make tackling low pay a national priority.’

 

Notes: The motion, which will be debated on 15th October 2014, reads as follows:

 

“That this House notes that the value of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) has been eroded since 2010 as working people have been hit by the cost-of-living crisis and are on average £1,600 a year worse off; recognises that the fall in the real value of the minimum wage since 2010 is now costing the public purse £270m a year in additional benefit and tax credit payments; further notes that the Chancellor of the Exchequer cruelly misled working people by saying he wanted to see a minimum wage of £7 while his government has no plans to reach this goal; calls on the Government to set an ambitious target for the NMW to significantly increase to 58% of median average earnings, putting it on course to reach £8 before the end of the next Parliament, supports action to help and encourage more firms to pay a living wage through Make Work Pay contracts to boost living standards and restore the link between hard work and fair pay so that everyone shares in the UK’s wealth, not just a few at the top; and further calls on the Government to set a national goal of halving the number of people on low pay by 2025.”

 

Labour’s Minimum Wage plans highlighted in Parliament

On the eve of an Opposition Day Debate in the House of Commons, Glasgow East MP Margaret Curran has called for the national minimum wage to be increased and properly...

Over the past few weeks I have been contacted by dozens of constituents about an upcoming House of Commons motion on whether or not the UK should recognise Palestinian Statehood. I will be voting to recognise statehood and want to explain why.

Palestinian statehood is not a gift to be given but a right to be recognised and that is why since 2011 Labour has supported Palestinian recognition at the United Nations. I fully support two states living side by side in peace, and recognised by all of their neighbours and it is clear that the events of recent months only underline the dangers for both Palestinians and Israelis of a resumption of violence and bloodshed. Labour is clear that this conflict will only be resolved through negotiations. However after decades of diplomatic failure there are those on all sides that today question whether a two-state solution is any longer possible.

That is why Labour believes that, amidst the undoubted despair and the disappointment, the international community must take concrete steps to strengthen moderate Palestinian opinion, encourage the Palestinians to take the path of politics, reject the path of violence, and rekindle hopes that there is a credible route to a viable Palestinian state and a secure Israel achieved by negotiations.

We are clear that Palestinian recognition at the UN would be such a step. That is why Labour called on the then Foreign Secretary, William Hague, in 2011 and in 2012 to commit Britain to supporting the Palestinians' bid for recognition at the UN, not as a means of bypassing the need for talks, but as a bridge for restarting them.

Labour’s consistent support for the principle of recognising Palestinian statehood, as part of continuing steps to achieve a comprehensive negotiated two state solution, is why I will be voting to support the principle of Palestinian statehood when the House of Commons debates the issue on Monday.

 

Palestinian Statehood Vote

Over the past few weeks I have been contacted by dozens of constituents about an upcoming House of Commons motion on whether or not the UK should recognise Palestinian Statehood....

East End MP Margaret Curran has hailed the hard-work of Garrowhill residents after the area’s Garden Estate beat hundreds of other entries to win best community garden in Scotland and £500 in Gardening vouchers in the 2014 Cultivation Street awards. The Garden, which was nominated by local man Barrie Linning, is now in with a chance of winning best community garden in Britain, and a £10,000 prize.

Margaret said: ‘Garrowhill Garden Estate is a real asset to the community and thoroughly deserves to be recognised in this way.  Great credit must go to everyone who has helped maintain the Garden over the years, particularly Barrie Linning who first set the Garrowhill Garden Estate Community Group up 5 years ago, and still dedicates a lot of his time to it today.’

Margaret hails victory for Garrowhill Garden Estate

East End MP Margaret Curran has hailed the hard-work of Garrowhill residents after the area’s Garden Estate beat hundreds of other entries to win best community garden in Scotland and...

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