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Margaret Curran, MP for Glasgow East, has urged schools and community groups to visit their local Commonwealth war graves to gain a greater understanding of the magnitude of the First and Second World Wars and the impact they have had on today’s society.

The call follows a national initiative spearheaded by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC), the All-Party Parliamentary War Heritage Group and the ‘In From The Cold Project’ that maps over 300,000 Commonwealth war dead by each Parliamentary constituency.  The initiative is supported by Ms Curran who recently visited 4 Commonwealth war graves in her constituency.

Margaret said: “The Centenary of the outbreak of the First World War is an opportunity, not just for reflection and commemoration, but also to educate a new generation of young people about the extraordinary, and terrible, events of the past.  I am pleased and humbled to have been able to attend four local war grave sites, both to pay my respects to those that lost their lives in the two world wars and hear about the work of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC). I would encourage local community groups and schools to consider visiting the graves or learning a bit more about them on the commission’s website.”

Deirdre Mills, CWGC’s Director of UK Area states that:  “The Centenary is an opportune time for us to re-engage and connect with local communities and young people, and explain how the people who are buried in our graves got to be there, who they were, and where they were from.  To highlight some of the personal stories of those who are buried or commemorated in our graves, we are installing over 100 visitor information panels throughout the UK during the Centenary.  The panels incorporate QR codes which, when scanned with the latest smartphone technology enable visitors to read these stories and understand the historical context.”

Following the launch of the Local War Graves Visits programme, which has been piloted in 6 locations and will be rolled out across the UK in the coming months, teachers will be able to take advantage of the CWGC’s network of vetted and fully trained volunteers to take them around sites and war graves, highlight key hotspots, and assist them with lesson planning.

At the Education Show in mid-March, CWGC launched an online Virtual Cemetery education portal that provides schools and teachers with a comprehensive range of resources and support materials linked to the graves and memorials in their home town. The virtual cemetery website www.cwgc-virtual-cemetery.org is an interactive tool which enables pupils and teachers to view images and videos, learn more about CWGC’s work across the globe, and – most importantly – the people that are commemorated  in its cemeteries and memorials.

 

For more information, contact: Peter Francis on 01628 507163 or 07766 255884 or by email peter.francis@cwgc.org

Ends.

Notes for editors:

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (www.cwgc.org)

  • CWGC maintains the graves of the 1.7 million Commonwealth servicemen and women who died during the two world wars. It also holds and updates an extensive and accessible records archive.
  • CWGC operates in over 23,000 locations in 153 countries across all continents except Antarctica.
  • A series of high-profile worldwide events will take place to mark the centenary of the First World War, many of which will take place at Commission sites. The Commission will ensure that these sites are maintained to the highest standard and is installing information panels at over 500 sites to enhance the visitor experience.
  • The CWGC provides teachers and youth workers with a comprehensive range of educational resources and support materials so that future generations remain engaged in the work of the CWGC and continue to remember those who died in the two world wars.
  • CWGC graves and memorials can be found in 13,000 locations throughout the UK.  These range from individual headstones in remote countryside to distinctive, larger groups of graves in big urban cemeteries run by local authorities.

On 15th August Ms Curran joined Iain Anderson, Regional Supervisor of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, on visits to war graves at:

 

-          Glasgow Sandymount Cemetery Glasgow

-          Glenduffhill Jewish Cemetery

-          Tollcross Central Churchyard

-          Glasgow Eastern Necropolis

Glasgow East MP urges schools and groups to visit local Commonwealth War Graves

Margaret Curran, MP for Glasgow East, has urged schools and community groups to visit their local Commonwealth war graves to gain a greater understanding of the magnitude of the First...

 

Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown joined Margaret Curran MP and Paul Martin MSP at a Scottish Independence Coffee Morning in St George’s and St Peter’s Church hall in Easterhouse earlier this week. Local residents, regardless of how they planned to vote, were invited to put their questions to the politicians over a tea or coffee.

 

Glasgow East MP, Margaret Curran said: ‘I was delighted to welcome Gordon back to the east end of Glasgow. The physical regeneration of Easterhouse over the past decade or so has only been possible because Gordon Brown transferred Glasgow’s £1bn housing debt to the UK Treasury when he was Chancellor. Spreading the historic debt across 60m people instead of just 500,000 has allowed Glasgow’s Housing Associations to invest in new stock on a massive scale.’

 

She continued: ‘We had a very interesting discussion, with local residents keen to ask questions and express their own views known about a whole range of issues; ranging from currency and pensions to recent SNP cuts to Kelvin College’s Easterhouse campus.’

 

END

 

Notes: The event took place on Monday, 11th August 2014 in St George’s and St Peter’s Church hall in Easterhouse.

 

Gordon Brown visits Easterhouse for Indy-ref coffee morning

  Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown joined Margaret Curran MP and Paul Martin MSP at a Scottish Independence Coffee Morning in St George’s and St Peter’s Church hall in Easterhouse...

Last week people across Scotland watched Alistair Darling and Alex Salmond debate the important issues ahead of the referendum next month. As we get closer to polling day conversations will be had at the kitchen table, around the water cooler and during the school run about one of the most important decisions Scots will take in their lifetimes.

 

But in order to take part you must be registered to vote before 2 September. To vote in the referendum you will need to be aged 16 or over on 18 September 2014 and living in Scotland. You must also be a British, qualifying Commonwealth or European Union citizen.

 

If you aren’t sure if you’re on the electoral register, or if you know you need to register to vote, your local electoral registration office can assist you. The Glasgow City Council Electoral Registration Office will be the right point of contact for most local residents but please visit www.aboutmyvote.co.uk to obtain details for your local electoral registration office.

 

The Electoral Commission has launched a voter information campaign to make sure every household in Scotland has the information they need before casting their ballot. Each household will receive an impartial guide to voting at the referendum from this week, containing factual information on how to register to vote and the different ways of casting a referendum vote.

 

I would encourage everyone to ensure they are registered and to encourage any friends and family members who may not have yet registered their details. Whilst I deeply hope to see a resounding No vote on the 18th of September it’s very important that people have their voices heard in what will be one of the most significant events in Scotland and across the UK. 

Important information about voter registration

Last week people across Scotland watched Alistair Darling and Alex Salmond debate the important issues ahead of the referendum next month. As we get closer to polling day conversations will...

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